lawn care business

The Best Lawn Care Logos

Nov 17, 2017

The Best Lawn Care Logo.png

After looking at over 500 lawn care logos (a conservative estimate) we selected the 19 logos we thought were the best. And “best” when it come to a business’s logo can mean many things. It’s kind of like art, everyone has the right to their own interpretations, opinions, and taste. But with that said, there is really bad art. So, we based our “best” off of the logo best practices we cover last week: How to Create a Lawn Care Logo. 

Make sure to vote for your favorite logo at the bottom of the page!

 

The Best Lawn Care Logos

 

 

Andre Landscape Service

andre full logo EDIT.png

California

Why?

Why? Because it’s my favorite. Kidding, but seriously this logo is suave, it has it all. Plus, it's versatile for any branding situation. I would say it was the 450th logo I looked at and it – along with the company's website and, estimated, marketing budget – blew me away. To start, the color palette stands out from others in the lawn care category (note: the idea of not doing what everyone else does will be a theme throughout the list). The icon has perfect proportions and its circular shape allows it to be put on pretty much anything that needs branding. Simply by looking at the logo you can tell it wasn’t just tossed together like a last-minute Halloween costume. The agency that did the design wrote up a case study about the rebrand and it details just how thorough the process was.

 

Agape Lawn Co.

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North Carolina

Why?

 To begin with, this company’s name is just flat-out cool. The accent (á) and macron (ē) alone have persuaded me to say their name about 73 times in my head. The logo is incredibly simple. The only non-text element is the green line that runs through the design. The grass-type action on the left draws the viewer’s focus in and moves their eyes to the right - basically guiding them to read their name.

 

Better Lawns & Gardens

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Arkansas

Why?

I’m not always cool with slanted logos or text but for them it works. The use of two different type classifications (Serif and Script) can do wonders if done well - like it is here. Similarly the light green with the sturdiness of black adds a lot without having to do that much work. All-in-all it’s a professional - yet fun - design (fun not just because you have to tilt you head a little to read it).

 

The Greenery, Inc.

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South Carolina

Why?

Similar to the one before this logo, I wouldn’t typically like a design with this style but it was executed perfectly. Add that to the consistency through all the design elements, you’re left with a logo that’s down-to-earth and approachable (i.e. employee owned) with some personality sprinkled throughout.

 

Terra Ferma Landscapes

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California

Why?

Similar to the one before this logo, I wouldn’t typically like a design with this style but it was executed perfectly. Add that to the consistency through all the design elements, you’re left with a logo that’s down-to-earth and approachable (i.e. employee owned) with some personality sprinkled throughout.

 

TruGreen

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Pretty Much Everywhere

Why?

The next three are some of the biggest companies in the green industry. So it’s not surprising each of their logos reflect the branding budget that’s needed for such expansive operations. TruGreen’s logo is clean and purposeful. There isn’t an element that distracts. Everything aligns with their brand and how they intend to use their logo. The text’s different grades of font (bold and regular) breaks down their name and what it means. Having two shades of the same color (green) allows them to adapt the logo depending on the background of where it’s place. On the top of their website they have a white version on an image slider. It’s a simple, effective and adaptable design.  

 

BrightView

brightviewlogo.png 

Almost Everywhere

Why?

It’s hard to go wrong the light blue and light green combination. The blue does most of the heavy lifting for the design. And that’s exactly what allows the logo to stand out in an industry that relies heavy (or even solely) on variations of green. This vibrant palette also plays off their name (the view is bright when you read BrightView). The story behind the rebranding of Brickman and ValleyCrest (the two companies that merged in 2014) is pretty interesting. They essentially wanted to keep the first letter of two companies when coming up with their new name.

 

LandCare

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Kind of Everywhere

Why?

This might just be my second favorite logo in this list (with andre landscape taking the number one spot). It’s probably because this is the only one that uses negative space of two letters to create a design element (check the ‘L’ and ‘a’). This leaf design is the same as their main icon, providing brand consistency when they need to adjust their logo for certain spaces. The color palette reminds me of Hasqvarna which has proven to work well in the green industry while also being a bit different.

 

 

Honorable Mention

 

Berghoff Design Group

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Arizona 

 

Strathmore Integrated Grounds Management

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Quebec

 

Cleanscapes

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Texas

 

Gachina Landscape Management 

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California

 

Siciliano Landscape Company

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New Jersey 

 

Level Green Landscaping

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Washington D.C.

 

Harvest landscape Enterprises

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California

 

Cast Your Vote

Choose Your Favorite Logo
LandCare
agape
Berghoff Design
Terra Ferma
The Greenery
andre landscape
Level Green
Clean Scapes
BrightView
TruGreen
Strathmore
Harvest
gachina
Siciliano
Better Lawn
created here
 

 

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